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Cheap n Easy Mods to improve fuel economy?

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  • Cheap n Easy Mods to improve fuel economy?

    Well...
    Here's what I have so far...

    Run Berrymans or Seafoam,
    Change plugs,
    Change air filter (replace with K&N or clean open air intake)
    Fill tires to maximum pressure (debateable, if tire says 44psi then I put 44psi)
    Remove resonator - replace with 4inch magnaflow or similar
    Optimize TB,
    LOWER THE WEIGHT OF THE CAR (i.e. empty trunk, don't car pool fat people, etc.) lol
    Keep windows closed on highways,


    This might be not as cheap...

    Rebuild UIM/LIM using FAQ on site,
    Add a bolt on exhaust,
    2002 Volvo S40 1.9T
    1998 Mercury Mystique LS (Written Off)


  • #2
    Forget the idea of "mods".

    Do you maintenance. Keep the vehicle tuned and maintained. Do not over-inflate the tires, use the recommended pressures on your vehicle's data sticker.

    "Modify" your driving habits instead. Avoid rapid starts and stops. Conserve motion (kinetic energy). Lower your driving speed.

    In case you have noticed, fuel prices have dropped by nearly 40% since just two months ago. Surprising you weren't more interested in economy when the prices were peaking.

    If you think about it, you'd have a really long payback period for most of those "mods" even at $3/gallon.

    Steve
    Retired 98 Contour SE Sport 2.5 Duratec ATX - Dead transmission @ 235K miles
    2001 F250 Super Duty 6.8L 4x4 - The NEW Workhorse 152K.
    2007 Mariner 3.0L AWD - Wifey's new ride
    2000 Contour V6 ATX Acquired 11/1/2013

    Comment


    • #3
      So even if my tires say 44psi I should go by what the sticker says? Who should I believe, the sticker or my tires (replaced the stocks with better tires)?
      2002 Volvo S40 1.9T
      1998 Mercury Mystique LS (Written Off)

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by m4gician View Post
        So even if my tires say 44psi I should go by what the sticker says? Who should I believe, the sticker or my tires (replaced the stocks with better tires)?

        most likely that is the max psi for the tire that is on the tire, go with what the stock sticker says, personally I run one pound higher on stock size tires then the sticker says
        - 12 Focus SE
        - 95 Mystique LS <-sold
        - 99 Contour SE Sport <- traded in 2/13
        - 99 Contour SeVT <- 3L/NPG Turbo
        - 2k Contour SVT - #2137

        Comment


        • #5
          optimizing the TB wouldnt help with fuel economy. it may increase HP but if you think about it, when the throttle is only partially open (during economical driving), there would be no benifit from the optimization because of the angle of the plate(dont know the technical name). so while an optimized TB may increase HP at WOT, it wont have more power during "economical" driving.
          ~Ryan
          2012 Subaru WRX
          1999 T-Red SVT Contour #1701 / 2760
          OZ Ultraleggera 17's, BAT Kit, MSDS, BAT High Flow Cat & Y-pipe, B&M Short Throw, Taylor Thundervolts, Green filter, Pudmunkie heat shield

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by m4gician View Post
            So even if my tires say 44psi I should go by what the sticker says? Who should I believe, the sticker or my tires (replaced the stocks with better tires)?
            I've heard you get better fuel economy with the tires inflated more. I was reading somewhere to go to the max of the tire for max fuel economy. There is a "correct" tire pressure which will maximise the life of the rubber, if you overinflate you will wear the middle of the tread prematurely, and if you underinflate you will wear the edges (thanks Auto-X-Fil). Depends on tyre, car, driving style and whatever so you need to experiment.
            00 Silver Frost SVTC #1429/2150: Born 10 Jan, 2000
            3.0L, Spec Stage 3 Clutch, LSD, Koni Sport Kit +more

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by SVTC1136 View Post
              I've heard you get better fuel economy with the tires inflated more. I was reading somewhere to go to the max of the tire for max fuel economy. There is a "correct" tire pressure which will maximise the life of the rubber, if you overinflate you will wear the middle of the tread prematurely, and if you underinflate you will wear the edges (thanks Auto-X-Fil). Depends on tyre, car, driving style and whatever so you need to experiment.
              Don't inflate your tires to the max. That doesn't make any sense.

              You may be saving gas, but its dangerous and you will also be wasting more money for tires.

              My suggestion is to learn how to drive conservatively (this can really add a lot to your MPG - don't brake uneccessarily, don't accelerate too hard, coast in gear to conserve kinetic energy, learn how to time stop lights so you can avoid coming to a complete stop before a stoplight, etc).

              For city driving 33-34 psi should be fine. If you do a lot of highway driving 35-36 psi could be ok. But that should plenty. Be safe!
              SOLD
              1998 E0 Ford Contour SVT - DOB 8/19/97 - #3101/6535
              Silver Frost/Midnight Blue

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by vcontoursvt View Post
                Don't inflate your tires to the max. That doesn't make any sense.

                You may be saving gas, but its dangerous and you will also be wasting more money for tires.

                My suggestion is to learn how to drive conservatively (this can really add a lot to your MPG - don't brake uneccessarily, don't accelerate too hard, coast in gear to conserve kinetic energy, learn how to time stop lights so you can avoid coming to a complete stop before a stoplight, etc).

                For city driving 33-34 psi should be fine. If you do a lot of highway driving 35-36 psi could be ok. But that should plenty. Be safe!
                Note I went on to say there is a correct tire pressure??? I agree that if you overinflate the tires they'll get premature wear which will offset any gas savings. As for dangerous????, if the tire manufacturer says its OK, I'd tend to accept their advice.
                00 Silver Frost SVTC #1429/2150: Born 10 Jan, 2000
                3.0L, Spec Stage 3 Clutch, LSD, Koni Sport Kit +more

                Comment


                • #9
                  The tire manufacturer has to cover their behind so that overinflated tires don't fail/

                  The vehicle manufactuere has to cover its behind because over-inflated tires will often negatively affect the vehicle's safety as to handling and stopping.

                  Gross over-inflation of a tire beyond the vehicles specification is just a bad idea.

                  Steve
                  Retired 98 Contour SE Sport 2.5 Duratec ATX - Dead transmission @ 235K miles
                  2001 F250 Super Duty 6.8L 4x4 - The NEW Workhorse 152K.
                  2007 Mariner 3.0L AWD - Wifey's new ride
                  2000 Contour V6 ATX Acquired 11/1/2013

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Don't know if this helps but here's what the National Highway Traffic Saftey Administration website has to say...

                    "Tires are manufactured for many different vehicle makes and models of vehicles. And the psi number on the side of a tire only reflects the “maximum permissible” inflation pressure for that tire — not necessarily the correct psi for your vehicle. When filling your tires, always follow your vehicle manufacturer’s psi recommendations. You’ll find this psi number on your vehicle’s tire information label, as well as in your vehicle owner’s manual."

                    For more info here's their URL http://safercar.gov/Tires/pages/TirePressureFAQ.htm
                    Gears, Guns and Girls...what else is there?
                    98 CSVT (my 2nd)
                    93 2.3T Stang Coupe
                    90 FXSTC Softail
                    02 F150
                    91 Nimitz Class Carrier....99K tons of Steel and Sex appeal

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                    • #11
                      Save gas, drive slower.
                      Last edited by Tony2005; 10-22-2006, 09:59 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Your tires are also suspension and steering components. Cars are designed for tires that behave in a somewhat predictable manner. By over-inflating them to max tire pressure, I believe you may wear out wheel bearings, tie-rods and struts at a faster rate.. I'm not sure how significant it is, but the fuel savings aren't worth it in my opinion. Your car may also behave in an unpredictable manner under certain conditions, possibly a safety issue.

                        Honestly, if you're doing things like over-inflating tires to save a little on gas, and desperately trying to save a few dollars everywhere, perhaps a Contique isn't right for you at this time. The cost to purchase a Contour is now disproportionate to its maintenance costs. They have the purchase price of a compact with the maintenance costs and fuel economy of an (arguably expensive) midsize car. There are vehicles that are significantly cheaper to run both in terms of fuel economy and maintenance in the same price range. Or perhaps consider a cheap, easy to maintain beater for the day to day grind.

                        In my experience, skimping, cutting corners, dealing with questionable garages and driving with a damaged or severely worn component(s) cause car ownership costs to skyrocket.
                        Last edited by Desiato; 10-22-2006, 10:47 PM.
                        99 SVT Contour #1082 (summer)
                        01 Subaru Outback (winter)
                        98 Mystique LS Sport 2.5L (RIP)
                        95 Contour LX 2.5L (RIP)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Desiato View Post
                          Your tires are also suspension and steering components. Cars are designed for tires that behave in a somewhat predictable manner. By over-inflating them to max tire pressure, I believe you may wear out wheel bearings, tie-rods and struts at a faster rate.. ...
                          Lower ball joints, seat springs, engine/tranny mounts.... Basically anything used for suspension or prevention of NVH.

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